History of Medicine Blogs

After writing my post on links to several of my daily must-read blogs on history of science and general history, by the time I got to the end of my post, I realized I was missing the history of medicine!

Did you know a quick Google search for “history of medicine blog(s)” does not provide an adequate list of worthwhile blogs covering topics on the history of medicine? If there’s any indication that those in charge need to rethink the decision about closing down the Wellcome Trust, the fact that the Wellcome is the FIRST on the search result should be enough.

So I spent most of my sleepless night/morning hunting through the blogsphere looking for a strong body of blogs covering topics on the history of medicine. Mind you, the list I generated mostly reflects my own interests in history of medicine–namely, quackery, early modern medicine, and images and imaging. Of course, I’ve added some blogs that are just fantastic and a must-read. Here goes:

First up of course, is the official blog of the Wellcome Trust. It’s mostly a repository for worthwhile news in science and biomedicine, a dash of art history, additions to the Trust, as well as other activities related to the Trust.

Originally a website for Holly Tucker’s undergraduate course at Vanderbilt University, Wonders and Marvels has grown into a fantastic blog covering topics in early modern medicine. Pages full of essential resources, such as research databases and links to primary sources online is a valuable addition; additionally, Tucker’s discussions on how blogging can enrich the education experience is noteworthy.

Respectful Insolence, is an anonymous blog of a surgeon/scientist on medicine, quackery, science, and pseudoscience.

The Medical Humanities Blog was actually the first blog covering issues in medicine that I’ve read daily. The blog covers topics on health policy and ethics, the social determinants of health, and issues in 19th and 20th centuries history of medicine.

The official blog for the National Museum of Health and Medicine in Washington, DC, A Repository for Bottled Monsters covers topics on the museum, new projects undertaken by its contributors, musing on the history of medicine, all wrapped up nicely with additions of interesting and fantastic pictures.

No longer active, Medieval Cripples, Crazies, Imbeciles…and a Service Dog? was a great blog by Greg Carrier, a deaf student at the University of York researching medieval disability studies.

Also, if you’re a HSS student, you cannot miss the HSS Graduate and Early Career Caucus blog,  a meeting place for graduate students and early career scholars in the history of science, medicine and technology. The blog provides valuable links and insights into grants, awards, publishing, conferences, and other topics essential for the graduate student’s career.

If you’re still antsy for more blogs, you can also check out Britney Wilkins’s 100 Awesome Blogs for History Junkies post, although be warned–history of science and medicine blogs barely made the list!

Once again, if you have any great blogs to add, please leave a comment!

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11 thoughts on “History of Medicine Blogs

  1. Pingback: Navigating the History of Science Blogosphere « From the Hands of Quacks: The Official Weblog of Jaipreet Virdi

  2. I searched this same topic and found out this blog. My opthalmology professor told us some interesting stories in medicine like, how Inca’s(or was it Red Indian’s)used ants to stitch wounds. He said there is a book titled “The history of medicine”,having a lot of interesting incidents which happened during the evolution of modern medicine. I have searched and couldn’t find such a book. Have you ever read a book having a similar title?

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